A creative, welcoming and diverse place for nonprofits in Indianapolis

Indiana Interchurch Center

About the Interchurch Center & Community

About the Interchurch Center & Community

The Indiana Interchurch Center is much more than a building. It’s a community of nonprofit organizations working to solve the most urgent challenges we face at home and abroad. The Interchurch Center provides offices where denomination administrative headquarters and nonprofits develop strategies and implementation plans. More importantly, it offers a space where these the broader community can engage in learning and conversing, service and advocacy. We invite you to visit the Interchurch Center, and participate in events that interest you.

A passion for social change and justice

A passion for social change and justice

Who are some of the members of the Interchurch Community and what do they care about?

Denominations. The Interchurch Center houses the administrative headquarters of several denomination: The United Church of Christ, Indiana-Kentucky Conference; the Christian Church in Indiana (Disciples of Christ); the Synod of Lincoln Trails (Presbyterian Church USA in Indiana and Illinois), the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis; the Whitewater Valley Presbytery; and the American Baptist Churches of Greater Indianapolis. Other religious groups call the Center home. The St. Mary of Magdala Catholic Community is one of the few Catholic churches in the  world that celebrates mass with a Womanpriest.
Health and wellness. The Minority Health Coalition of Marion County and the Indiana Rural Health Association extend health services to the most marginalized populations. Even the health of animals are addressed: Spay and Neuter Services of Indiana helps low-income families afford to spay their pets.
Undocumented immigrants. The Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance is one of the state's best known groups protecting the rights of "Dreamers" and other undocumented Hoosiers.
Homeless people. The Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Protection (CHIP) is Central Indiana's main organization analyzing homelessness and  building a blueprint to end it.
Environmental protection. Three of Indiana's leading environmental organizations call the Interchurch Center home: the Hoosier Chapter of the Sierra Club, Earth Charter Indiana and Hoosier Interfaith Power and Light. The Hoosier Environmental Council offers monthly environmental advocate training at the IIC.
Opioid crisis. Overdose Lifeline has emerged as one of the country's most influential organizations fighting drug overdose.
Interfaith engagement. The Center for Interfaith Cooperation is one of the Midwest's primary groups promoting inter-religious education, dialogue and service. The Niagara Foundation organizes monthly interfaith conversations and several interfaith iftars at the Interchurch Center every Ramadan. The Jewish Community Relations Council and the Muslim Alliance of Indiana are the main groups promoting interfaith cooperation for the Jewish and Muslim communities.
Refugees in Indiana and around the world. OBAT Helpers is one of the only NGOs in the world working in the camps of the Rohingya in Bangladesh. The Peace Center for Forgiveness and Reconciliation helps Congolese refugees integrate into Hoosier society.
Civic renewal. Since January of 2016, Women4Change Indiana has become one of the state's main groups promoting greater engagement for women in politics, and helping Hoosiers more broadly become more active and effective citizens.
Human and civil rights. The Center for Interfaith Cooperation, the Jewish Community Relations Council and the Muslim Alliance of Indiana  defend the rights to worship of all Hoosiers. Gender Nexus advocates for the rights of trans-persons. The Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance promotes the rights of undocumented immigrants. The American Friends Service Committee passionately calls for the respect of human rights of Palestinians in Gaza.
Marginalized children. In addition to defending "Dreamers," the Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance raises funds for economically disadvantaged immigrants to attend college. Visually Impaired Preschool Services (VIPS) works with the families of unsighted young children. Watch Club and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation organized an intercultural Summer Youth Camp at IIC. The Waza Alliance for Quality Education provides training for teachers in the Democratic of Congo.
Food insecurity. Faith Hope and Love supports and trains missional food pantries across the city.

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What the Interchurch Center offers

24 Hr Access

Mail Service, UPS, FedEx On-Site

Fiber-Optic
Internet Connectivity

HD Projectors

An inclusive and welcoming culture

2 Large Meeting Rooms
4 more intimate conference rooms

Ample free parking

Easy Bus Access

Natural Habitat Certification

Energy management and solar panels

On-Site Management

Central Location close to the IMA, CTS & Butler

On-site Art Gallery

24-Hour Camera Surveillance

Fully Accessible to all

Come to the Interchurch Center and be inspired!

The Interchurch Center's Events
September 24, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

How Did the Framers Create the Constitution?

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September 27, 2018

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

It’s OK to Laugh

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October 1, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

How Has the Constitution Been Changed to Further the Ideals Contained in the Declaration of Independence?

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October 8, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

How Have the Values and Principles Embodied in the Constitution Shaped American Institutions and Practices?

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October 15, 2018

6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

What Rights Does the Bill of Rights Protect?

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See many more events
Interchurch Community's News & Happenings
JCRC — Floyd County police investigating swastika graffiti at Azalea Hills

JCRC — Floyd County police investigating swastika graffiti at Azalea Hills

"Floyd County police investigating swastika graffiti at Azalea Hills," Elizabeth Depompei, News…

CIC — Indianapolis interfaith community remembers the man who brought them together

CIC — Indianapolis interfaith community remembers the man who brought them together

“When you think of people who make a difference in life, people who do not have a negative bone in their bodies, that was Shahid,” said K.P. Singh, an Indianapolis based artist and practicing Sikh who worked with Athar founding the original Interfaith Alliance. “He exuded kindness and happiness to all others.

Overdose Lifeline — Overdose deaths decrease, antidote credited

Overdose Lifeline — Overdose deaths decrease, antidote credited

In looking at opioid overdose deaths, Vigo County experienced 16 in 2014 and 15 opioid OD deaths in 2015, but then saw an alarming increase to 26 deaths in both 2016 and 26 in 2017.

CHIP — Advocates say amount of homeless teens in Indy may be underreported

CHIP — Advocates say amount of homeless teens in Indy may be underreported

“That’s one in fifty young adults and one in one hundred youth,” said Alan Witchey, Executive Director of CHIP who compared local findings with national averages. “This may only be 20 percent of the total population in the city of youth and young adults who are homeless every year.”

JCRC — Response to hateful graffiti in Indianapolis was inspiring

JCRC — Response to hateful graffiti in Indianapolis was inspiring

We heard from the Anti-Defamation League, the Jewish Community Relations Council, gay rights groups, Urban League reps. All said about the same thing. We will not sit quietly while such hateful acts take place in our community. The standing room only crowd interrupted each speaker with rounds of applause.

Overdose Lifeline — Opioid education proposed for district schools

Overdose Lifeline — Opioid education proposed for district schools

Laura Widman, a researcher at N.C. State University, presented the plan “This is (Not) About Drugs,” an education program by Indiana-based Overdose Lifeline Inc., a nonprofit that focuses on people and communities affected by addiction.

CIC — CIC Strongly Condemns Vandalism At Congregation Shaarey Tefilla

CIC — CIC Strongly Condemns Vandalism At Congregation Shaarey Tefilla

Center for Interfaith Cooperation has strongly condemned vandalism at Congregation Shaarey Tefilla,…

JCRC — DespiteEven as Indiana lawmakers from both parties continue to echo Gov. Eric Holcomb’s call for hate crime legislation, the deep divisions that foiled previous attempts to pass a bias-motivated crime bill appear to still be entrenched.  Monday, Holcomb announced his intention to get a hate crime bill through the Statehouse during the 2019 General Assembly session. He said he would be meeting with legislators, corporate leaders and citizens to find consensus so Indiana can join the 45 other states that have statutes regarding crimes motived by hate or bias.  “No law can stop evil,” Holcomb said, “but we should be clear that our state stands with the victims and their voices will not be silenced.”  Holcomb made his public statement of support for hate crime legislation following an act of vandalism at a Carmel synagogue over the weekend. An outbuilding at the Congregation Shaarey Tefilla was spray-painted with Nazi symbols.  Republicans and Democrats in the Legislature have since issued statements reiterating the governor’s view. But Democrats noted that while they have proposed and supported hate crime measures, their colleagues across the aisle have resisted and failed to take action in getting a bill passed.  “(The Democrats) have persistently pursued bias-motivated crime legislation in the Indiana Senate, and each year our legislation is ignored by the majority party with promises of future consideration,” said Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, D-Anderson.  Incoming Senate president Rodric Bray, R-Martinsville, said he is pleased to collaborate with Holcomb and the House of Representatives to continue the work of crafting “legislation that mirrors our Hoosier hospitality.”  Conversely, House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, voiced support for the victims but was noncommittal about passing a law.  “This summer, the Interim Study Committee on Corrections and Criminal Code will take another look at the issue of bias-motivated crimes and identify opportunities for legislative consensus,” Bosma said. “Indiana Judges already have the ability to enhance sentences based on a criminal’s motivation when presented with evidence of bias, but perhaps more needs to be done to clarify and highlight this existing provision.”  Also Monday, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill released a 761-word op-ed also calling for the Legislature to pass a law that “criminalizes hateful conduct.”  However, his position mirrors the opposition to hate crime bills that these measures carve out special protections for select groups. The list of protected classes often included in the proposed legislation is seen as excluding individuals who are part of a majority.  “My proposal differs from many other so-called hate-crimes proposals in that it avoids entirely the exercise of separating ‘protected groups’ from ‘non-protected,’” Hill wrote. “Why should some groups receive greater protection from hateful conduct than others?”  For community organizations pushing for a bias-motivated crime bill, the removal of the specific protected groups would be unacceptable. David Sklar, director of government affairs for the Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, called it a non-starter.  Hate crime bills that have been introduced in the Indiana Legislature in the past have included a list of characteristics identifying the protected classes. The bills specify that individuals or groups could have their sentences enhanced if they commit a criminal act that targets others because of their religion, race, gender and ethnicity. Holcomb’s support, hate crimes bill lacks unity

JCRC — DespiteEven as Indiana lawmakers from both parties continue to echo Gov. Eric Holcomb’s call for hate crime legislation, the deep divisions that foiled previous attempts to pass a bias-motivated crime bill appear to still be entrenched. Monday, Holcomb announced his intention to get a hate crime bill through the Statehouse during the 2019 General Assembly session. He said he would be meeting with legislators, corporate leaders and citizens to find consensus so Indiana can join the 45 other states that have statutes regarding crimes motived by hate or bias. “No law can stop evil,” Holcomb said, “but we should be clear that our state stands with the victims and their voices will not be silenced.” Holcomb made his public statement of support for hate crime legislation following an act of vandalism at a Carmel synagogue over the weekend. An outbuilding at the Congregation Shaarey Tefilla was spray-painted with Nazi symbols. Republicans and Democrats in the Legislature have since issued statements reiterating the governor’s view. But Democrats noted that while they have proposed and supported hate crime measures, their colleagues across the aisle have resisted and failed to take action in getting a bill passed. “(The Democrats) have persistently pursued bias-motivated crime legislation in the Indiana Senate, and each year our legislation is ignored by the majority party with promises of future consideration,” said Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, D-Anderson. Incoming Senate president Rodric Bray, R-Martinsville, said he is pleased to collaborate with Holcomb and the House of Representatives to continue the work of crafting “legislation that mirrors our Hoosier hospitality.” Conversely, House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, voiced support for the victims but was noncommittal about passing a law. “This summer, the Interim Study Committee on Corrections and Criminal Code will take another look at the issue of bias-motivated crimes and identify opportunities for legislative consensus,” Bosma said. “Indiana Judges already have the ability to enhance sentences based on a criminal’s motivation when presented with evidence of bias, but perhaps more needs to be done to clarify and highlight this existing provision.” Also Monday, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill released a 761-word op-ed also calling for the Legislature to pass a law that “criminalizes hateful conduct.” However, his position mirrors the opposition to hate crime bills that these measures carve out special protections for select groups. The list of protected classes often included in the proposed legislation is seen as excluding individuals who are part of a majority. “My proposal differs from many other so-called hate-crimes proposals in that it avoids entirely the exercise of separating ‘protected groups’ from ‘non-protected,’” Hill wrote. “Why should some groups receive greater protection from hateful conduct than others?” For community organizations pushing for a bias-motivated crime bill, the removal of the specific protected groups would be unacceptable. David Sklar, director of government affairs for the Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, called it a non-starter. Hate crime bills that have been introduced in the Indiana Legislature in the past have included a list of characteristics identifying the protected classes. The bills specify that individuals or groups could have their sentences enhanced if they commit a criminal act that targets others because of their religion, race, gender and ethnicity. Holcomb’s support, hate crimes bill lacks unity

For community organizations pushing for a bias-motivated crime bill, the removal of the specific protected groups would be unacceptable. David Sklar, director of government affairs for the Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, called it a non-starter.

JCRC — Rabbi: Vandalism triggered “outpouring of support”

JCRC — Rabbi: Vandalism triggered “outpouring of support”

Lindsey Mintz, Executive Director of the Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, says passing that law is more important now than ever, to “send a message.” “The state of Indiana from policy leaders on down will not stand for acts of hate based on bias,” said Mintz.”

MAI — Carmel hate crime: Mayor asks residents to fly flags to show solidarity against ‘this horrific act of vandalism’

MAI — Carmel hate crime: Mayor asks residents to fly flags to show solidarity against ‘this horrific act of vandalism’

“Hoosier hospitality has no room for hate,” said Aliya Amin, executive director of the Muslim Alliance of Indiana.

JCRC — Anti-Semitic graffiti found at Carmel synagogue

JCRC — Anti-Semitic graffiti found at Carmel synagogue

The Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council is working closely with the congregation to offer assistance and support. The organization has also reached out to other Indianapolis-area congregations to ensure that they are taking the necessary security precautions.

Earth Charter — Indianapolis teens learn about trauma recovery, urban farming from bees and butterflies

Earth Charter — Indianapolis teens learn about trauma recovery, urban farming from bees and butterflies

“(The pollinator count) will reinforce ideas that we are faced with many challenges regarding the natural world and our interaction with it,” said Jim Poyser, executive director of Earth Charter Indiana. “But especially in the pollinator area of concern, there are lots of solutions literally at our fingertips.”

Earth Charter — Mayor Affirms City Commitment to Sustainability

Earth Charter — Mayor Affirms City Commitment to Sustainability

“I’m glad that he came to speak. He’s been very supportive throughout all of this. And I think that it’s great that he supports the youth of the community, and this cause,” adds Ella, age 12, a participant in the march.

Earth Charter — Not just Starbucks and McDonald’s: Indianapolis restaurants are ditching plastic straws

Earth Charter — Not just Starbucks and McDonald’s: Indianapolis restaurants are ditching plastic straws

“I was in a restaurant looking at a sea of straws sticking out of glasses,” said Poyser, executive director of Earth Charter Indiana. Then he thought of a pun that just tickled him — a straw bale not made out of stalks of grain but the non-biodegradable, plastic tubes we get with every drink.

CHIP — New plan to address homelessness in Indianapolis unveiled

CHIP — New plan to address homelessness in Indianapolis unveiled

The new plan also identifies four special populations that have the highest rates of homelessness – chronically homeless, veterans, youth and families. Stakeholders have assessed the best ways to assist each of these groups.

Overdose Lifeline — Carmel Church Adopts New Initiative Combating Opioids

Overdose Lifeline — Carmel Church Adopts New Initiative Combating Opioids

Volunteers from Overdose Lifeline will lead both educational and emotional support sessions. Zehr says his parish, Carmel Christian Church, is the first PAL group in Hamilton County and others are considering similar programs. He says the opioid crisis is everyone’s issue.

Sierra Club — IPL Looked Up The Bills Of Opponents To Latest Rate Case

Sierra Club — IPL Looked Up The Bills Of Opponents To Latest Rate Case

"IPL Looked Up The Bills Of Opponents To Latest Rate Case," WFYI,…

Overdose Lifeline — New initiative arms local churches with tools to help in opioid epidemic

Overdose Lifeline — New initiative arms local churches with tools to help in opioid epidemic

"New initiative arms local churches with tools to help in opioid epidemic,"…

Overdose-Lifeline — Bacon, Blues & Brew fest here Saturday

Overdose-Lifeline — Bacon, Blues & Brew fest here Saturday

A portion of proceeds will support the nonprofit Overdose Lifeline [which] is dedicated to helping individuals, families and communities affected by the disease of addiction/substance use disorder through advocacy, education, harm reduction, prevention, resources and support.

MAI — Advocates: Travel ban opponents say public must raise its voice

MAI — Advocates: Travel ban opponents say public must raise its voice

"Advocates: Travel ban opponents say public must raise its voice," The Indiana…

Sierra Club — Indiana To Update Energy Efficiency, Safety Rules For New Homes

Sierra Club — Indiana To Update Energy Efficiency, Safety Rules For New Homes

Hoosier Chapter of the Sierra Club hopes proposed updates to the Residential Code will reduce pollution and save people money. The chapter’s energy efficiency organizer Monica Cannaley says the new draft of the code requires builders to put more insulation in new homes, use an energy rating index, and test for air leaks.

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Indiana Interchurch Center
1100 W. 42nd Street
Indianapolis IN 46208

Phone:
(317) 923-3617

Email:
iic@indianainterchurch.org

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