Interchurch Community — “Powerful Storytelling, Films, and Interactive Events Part of 2019 Spirit & Place Festival Starting Nov. 2”

WIBW, October 25, 2019

Now in its 24th year, the Spirit & Place Festival continues to be Indianapolis’ largest collaborative festival that uses the arts, religion, and humanities as tools for shaping individual and community life through 10 days of events designed with community partners, individuals and congregations.

There will be 32 unique events this year that will take place across Indianapolis and feature a variety of presenters, speakers, and performers. This year’s festival includes many events centered around panel-style discussions over powerful topics. These discussions are intended to spark conversation and explore current and historical events that are relevant to citizens of Central Indiana.

Visit the website at www.spiritandplace.org for the full festival lineup, including these interactive events below:

Tuesday, November 5, 6 p.m. until 8 p.m.

A Faith Leader & a Scientist Walk into a Bar: Using Improv to Talk about Science and Faith

Presented by IUPUI/IU School of Medicine Communicating Science Program; The DaVinci Pursuit; Center for Interfaith Cooperation; March for Science Indiana; and IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society. 

Books & Brews South Indy – 3808 S. Shelby St.

Let’s talk science and religion over coffee or a beer! Using theatrical improvisation techniques, you’ll be given the chance to take on the persona of a scientist, faith leader, or “everyday person” and then practice empathy-rooted communication strategies.


Wednesday, November 6, 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.

Backs Against the Wall: A Film Screening & Discussion on the Howard Thurman Story

Presented by the Center for Interfaith Cooperation and Butler University Center for Faith and Vocation. Part of the New View Film Series.

Edison-Duckwall Recital Hall – 4600 Sunset Blvd.

Join in on a documentary film screening of “Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story” followed by a riveting discussion and multi-art performance inspired by this influential theologian, poet, mystic, and philosopher of nonviolence.


Thursday, November 7, 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m.

The Art of Boycott: Speech, Resistance, and Revolution

Presented by American Friends Service Committee, Muslim Youth Collective, VOCAB, Garfield Park Arts Center, and Jewish Voice for Peace – Indiana

Garfield Park Arts Center – 2432 Conservatory Dr.

An exhibition and panel discussion exploring the art, theory, and practice of boycott: how small changes in behavior can drive systemic change and achieve justice.


Sunday, November 10, 2 p.m. until 4 p.m.

The World We Live(d) In

Presented by JCC Indianapolis, Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council, Dance Kaleidoscope, Indiana Writers Center, and Indianapolis Art Center

JCC Indianapolis – 6701 Hoover Rd.

A juxtaposition of social the justice climate of yesterday and today interpreted through poetry and dance.

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