Interchurch Community — “Hoosiers deserve ‘specific and clear’ hate crime law”

Indianapolis Star, March 2 2019

On Feb. 16, a Muslim man, by the name of Mustafo Ayoubi, was shot and killed in Indianapolis after being the victim of road rage and the recipient of anti-Muslim slurs.  The sister of Ayoubi made it known that she desired for a hate crime investigation to take place. But the state of Indiana is one of five states that does not have a hate crime law. As Indiana faith leaders we are saddened by this event and hold Ayoubi’s family in our prayers. We also add our collective voice to call for hate crime legislation to be enacted.

Our faith traditions share the belief that all persons are created in the image of God and are created with inherent dignity and worth. This understanding makes it all the more imperative that hate crimes legislation be enacted that is thorough, just, and reflective of the diverse humanity that makes up our communities. 

We strongly urge our elected officials to pass legislation that will define what constitutes a bias-motivated crime and include specific classes that are protected by the law. Crafting legislation that offers specific language to address crimes related to race, gender, and sexual orientation is crucial to all feeling safe and at peace. We especially urge our elected officials to ensure that the statute they pass protects people on the basis of gender identity, since transgender people in our communities are among the most vulnerable of God’s beloved children. All Hoosiers deserve the safety and protection of a hate crime law that is specific and clear.

We are grateful for our elected officials and hold them in prayer as they craft this needed law. May such legislation underscore the dignity of all whom God has created and reflect our proud history of Hoosier hospitality.

Rev. Chad R. Abbott, Conference Minister

Indiana-Kentucky Conference, United Church of Christ

The Rt. Rev. Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows, Bishop

Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis 

Rev. Sara Dingman, Synod Executive

Synod of Lincoln Trails, President Church (USA)

Rev. Dr. William O. Gafkjen, Bishop

Indiana-Kentucky Synod, ELCA

The Rt. Rev. Dr. Douglas Sparks, Bishop

Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana

Rev. Richard L. Spleth, Regional Minister

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Indiana

Rev. Taylor Alan Thames, Executive Presbyter

Whitewater Valley Presbytery, Presbyterian Church (USA)

Most Reverend Charles C. Thompson, Archbishop

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis

The Rev. Dr. Julius C. Trimble, Bishop

Indiana Conference of The United Methodist Church

Categories: Action

Tags:

Post Your Thoughts

Related Posts
Images from “Red, Black, Green”

Images from “Red, Black, Green”

Thursday July 5th — More than 60 people attended the opening reception for "Red, Black,…

Interchurch Community — “The Politics of Hummus: Jewish Voice For Peace and Allies Create Alternative Interfaith Spaces”

Interchurch Community — “The Politics of Hummus: Jewish Voice For Peace and Allies Create Alternative Interfaith Spaces”

“We took that back to the committee, and we looked at it and agreed [it was problematic],” says Wiles. The JCRC and the Muslim Alliance of Indiana also concurred that the suggested film was problematic, and a different film was chosen.

Indiana Interchurch Center, AFSC — “NUVO Priorities 2019: Examining Arts More Closely”

Indiana Interchurch Center, AFSC — “NUVO Priorities 2019: Examining Arts More Closely”

For example, at the Indiana Interchurch Center a number of advocacy organizations are eager to hold hands and sing “Kum bay ya” around topics like hate crimes legislation. What happens, though, when certain groups have irreconcilable differences over certain issues? Like, say the international Boycott Divest Sanction movement against Israel?