Overdose Lifeline — Event Provides Overdose Reversal Drug, Training

Event Provides Overdose Reversal Drug, Training,” Jill Sheridan, Indiana Public Media, September 28 2018.

The public had an opportunity to learn to administer the overdose reversal drug naloxone in Indianapolis. The event was held simultaneously at four public libraries in the city.

More than 200 people attended the public training on the campus of IUPUI. Indiana University’s Addictions Crisis Grand Challenge hosted the event that also provided free nasal doses of the overdose reversing drug.

Assistant professor of nursing at IUPUI Amy Knopf says after her brother overdosed and was saved by naloxone, she reached out to a nonprofit Overdose Lifeline that partners with the state to provide naloxone.

“How can I get a kit, what can I do? I have to do something and this feels like the only thing I can do,” says Knopf.

Knopf attended the event to provide support. Others were trained to use the drug.

“Once I got the training I was surprised by how simple it is and I carry my naloxone kit everywhere I go,” says Knopf. “I always have it on me.”

Anyone can purchase naloxone over the counter in Indiana.

The event also included a panel discussion that focused on the importance of harm reduction methods and stigma reduction.

A recent Indiana University survey finds 63 percent of Hoosiers know someone with an addiction.

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