Peace Center for Forgiveness and Reconciliation — Rwandan Genocide Pop-up Museum

Jamie Coakley, “Rwandan Genocide Pop-up Museum,” Nuvo April 19, 2018

We are proud to share that we were recently awarded the Indiana Humanities Grant and have had the opportunity to create a pop-up museum which highlights Rwandan Culture, the 1994 Rwandan Genocide against the Tutsti, and Genocides and Peace Movements around the world.

I invite you to schedule an appointment to view our exhibits and hear Kizito Kalima, the founder of our organization and a survivor of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, speak about his personal experiences. The Peace Center invites local schools, businesses, and organizations to tour the museum by appointment. Visitors may also request the opportunity to learn from the founder of PCFR, Kizito Kalima, a survivor of the 1994 Genocide. The pop-up museum is free for the public to attend! We welcome any donations; all proceeds benefit programs provided here at PCFR for refugee youth and their families.

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Kalima, the founder of the Peace Center for Forgiveness and Reconciliation, recounted his story as a fourteen-year-old boy trying to survive the Rwandan Genocide to a group in the Graduate Lounge at East Campus on Nov. 21.

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Kalima said he learned that the common denominator between the great advocates of forgiveness and reconciliation down through the ages, including Mahatma Gandhi and Mother Teresa in India, and Nelson Mandela in South Africa was: They all forgave.